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[MMM] Key leadership traits

Steve Job’s daughter is about to release a memoir called “Small Fry” about what it was like to have him as a father. This was a daughter from a previous relationship and it took many years for him to embrace her into his family.

 

The memoir is quite controversial. She shares many things that are not that flattering about his ability to parent her. It’s a very personal perspective on her father. If you’ve read Walter Isaac’s biography “Steve Jobs”, you will see the type of professional leader he was and what drove him to build two of the world’s leading companies: Apple and Pixar.

 

 

Putting aside what is written about him, you do realize that he had a particular leadership style, both as a parent and as a professional. It apparently worked for many of the leaders who reported to him and the proof is in the longevity of the great leaders that still work at Apple.

 

This year, I also read the biographies of Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos. As I pondered each of these leaders, I realized none of their leadership styles are similar; they all have their strengths and weaknesses and are incredible leaders in their own way.

 

So if there is no single right way to lead, what do you look for in a leader?

 

We are continually doing research on the latest trends and themes shifting around leadership in Canada and within the different employment sectors. Along these lines we recently participated in a national trade show for those that plan meetings, incentive programs and motivational seminars. We thought this would be an excellent opportunity to explore thoughts about leadership.

 

We asked a simple question: “What is leadership?” We tallied and ranked the responses and the top ones were:

 

1. Mentoring

 

2. Positive Influence

 

3. Integrity

 

4. Courage

 

5. Fundamental

 

In our practice of coaching and developing leaders in different sectors, I would concur that these are core things that we look for in our leaders. The reality is, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos would all be strong in some of these areas. And yet, they would rank differently for each if we were to put them through an assessment methodology.

 

What does this mean for you? You are not Steve, Jeff nor Elon and that is totally fine. Most of us are not going to build global firms, but all of us must be comfortable with who we are.

 

Most of us are not going to build global firms, run federal departments or lead NGO’s, but all of us have the opportunity to be the best leader that we can be, with the gifts, strengths and weaknesses that we all inherently have.

 

Think Differently. Be fully you.

 

Leading along the road with you,

 

Alan

 

P.S. Our Leadership Development and Executive Coaching can help you to better understand your or your employees’ specific strengths and how to continue to develop them. Reach out to Amanda or Brit on our client success team at 1-877-256-2569 ext 4 or info@careerjoy.com to learn more about how to make the most of your unique leadership style.

 

P.P.S. Are you a leader looking at self-employment options? Join Laurie Fenske, Senior Career and Leadership coach, during our Self-Employment webinar onSeptember 12 from 12-1 pm as she discusses high level business planning including developing a personal brand and how working with a CareerJoy coach could help you get started.