In the Media

Alan Kearns, Canada's career coach, provides regular commentary on career issues to a number of different news organizations including, CBC radio, Canada AM, Breakfast Television, The Toronto Star, The National Post , The Globe and Mail as well as a numerous magazines and online blogs. He has a very popular podcast; CareerJoy Conversations. He is an expert on career management from a uniquely Canadian perspective. Alan is the author of Get the Right Job; Right Now! published by HarperCollins.

Alan can normally respond in a timely manner for your deadlines and can be reached at 1-877-256-2569 101 or alan.kearns@CareerJoy.com

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CBC Radio Morning Column by Rubina Ahmed-Haq, featuring Alan Kearns

Listen Here -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAv4aLtCnsY&list=UU6m6xjV3SKb6CZBSYm9Yhig

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Employers hiring university grads for more entry-level jobs


Landing a dream job (or just any job)

Alan Kearns, founder of CareerJoy says the days of graduating from college then sending out hundreds of resumes are gone...

 

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Job Seeker, Know Thyself

Career coach Alan Kearns says the best career advice is to be true to who you are.  Finding the right job in chemical sciences and engineering is more complex than ever...

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Career Coaches Help Shape Your Future

Former National Hockey League player Sean Pronger had many coaches during his 11-year professional career. But when he decided to hang up his skates seven years ago, he turned to career coach Alan Kearns to help him figure out what to do next....

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UC&C and the Job Market: Career Advice for IT

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If You Don't Do What You Love, You're Screwed

It's still important to finding your calling - even when it's hard enough just to find a job...

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Charity VillageIt's Time to Brandish Your Personal Brand

Alan Kearns describes the personal branding imperative the only way a Canuck can: "We call it the Roll up the Rim principle."

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McDonald's(R) Shows First Time Job Seekers They Can Go from Small Fry to Big Cheese
Market Watch - Wall Street Journal

McDonald’s creates 4,500 jobs across Canada - FoodBev.com

 

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Global TorontoDubbed as 'Canada's Career Coach' and the founder of 'Career Joy', Alan Kearns tells us what jobs are in demand for today's university students.

According to a recent survey of what jobs are in demand, and what students are studying in university, many, if not most, of today’s university students are spending a lot of money to get themselves a university degree that will prove essentially useless to them the instant they graduate. Watch online.

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Million Dollar Neighbourhood

 

 

CareerJoy is the career expert team for the Million Dollar Neighbourhood - a new reality Show on the Oprah Network. Watch online.

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Frankly Speaking: How to Tell Your Bosses What You Really Think of Them

Nancy MacCready-Williams was a newly minted executive with the Workers' Compensation Board of Nova Scotia when she chaired a meeting on a new initiative the organization was evaluating.

Moments after the meeting started, Ms. MacCready-Williams quickly weighed in with her opinion. It didn't go over the way she thought it would.

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Charity VillageWhy do you want to make more money?

Alan Kearn, founder of Career Joy, always asks clients what may seem a strange question: Why do you want to make more money? "The 'why'," he says, "has to be about more than money."

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How Good References Make all the Difference

Even with years of management experience in manufacturing operations, logistics and industrial engineering, Andrew Avgousti wasn’t sure how easy it would be to jump from the automotive industry – where he had worked since 1990, right out of university – to something different. But he had a powerful lever in his job-hunting tool kit: a select group of former bosses, peers and colleagues willing to vouch for his work performance and personal character.

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Employment: How to handle stress from work turbulance

"I had one day to sulk about it," says Steve Zolis, of his downsized job, "before I had to get off my duff."  Zolis, 33, was laid off last summer from his job as marketing manager for a large camera retailer. "When I talk about stress, I mean it. I had just begun an eight-week renovation on a new house, and we were two weeks away from having our second child." Zolis's experience is shared by recession-endangered employees across Canada, and around the world. Layoffs and corporate change are the new professional stressors, trumping workload and staff conflict.

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eFinancialCareersWhy Basel III will make Canadian Banks Look very Attractive


Canadian banks are increasingly setting their sights on U.S. targets, promising still more prospects for job seekers. That’s why U.S. professionals might want to consider a move to Canada - or at least one of the Canadian banks. 

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eFinancialCareers Confronting the Boss: New Rules of the Road

Is honesty really the best policy when it means complaining to your boss?

As official probes into actions by Goldman Sachs and other major banks zero in on decisions and processes at all levels of an organization, finance professionals need to think harder than ever about when and how to speak up if something is bothering them. The rules of the game have changed, observes Alan Kearns, founder of Toronto-based coaching firm Career Joy, whose clients include many investment bankers and financial planners. "The most problematic areas now are not technical issues but moral or ethical choices," Kearns says.

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Why it Pays to Tell the Boss what you Really Think of Them

Nancy MacCready-Williams was a newly minted executive with the Workers' Compensation Board of Nova Scotia when she chaired a meeting on a new initiative the organization was evaluating. Moments after the meeting started, Ms. MacCready-Williams quickly weighed in with her opinion. It didn't go over the way she thought it would. As the room cleared out after the meeting, a subordinate took her aside, and asked her to consider "toning down the passion." The employee told Ms. MacCready-Williams, now president and chief executive officer of the workplace injury insurance provider, that her enthusiasm and energy could be intimidating to some employees.

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Too Good to Reward? You might just have Streep Syndrome

It’s not the distinction she was going for, but Meryl Streep was forced to accept it. At this weekend’s Academy Awards, the star of Julie and Julia smiled through all the gentle ribbing about how she’s been nominated for an Oscar 16 times, which makes her the most-nominated actor in history. The problem: While co-stars, directors and critics can’t compliment her enough, she’s only nabbed the award twice – the last time for the 1982 film Sophie’s Choice. Such snubbing isn’t exclusive to Hollywood – “Streep Syndrome” is common in the workplace, too.

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Office jerks finish first

Picture an office where you're surrounded by decent human beings. Your co-workers share responsibility in good times and bad. They listen, they co-operate, they keep the office kitchen clean. Sound much like your office? Not likely. Nearly three-quarters of us face rudeness and condescension at work, researchers at the University of Illinois say. Jerks lurk behind the cubicle walls of every office.

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How to ask permission to go to eMBA school

Hey, boss! Whaddya say I take a year off work, go back to college, and have the company pony up the cash to pay for it?” No, this is not the script you’ll want to follow when requesting time off to do an MBA—especially not when your approach could determine whether you’ve got a job waiting for you when you get back. Alan Kearns, the founder of national career coaching firm CareerJoy, offers five steps to getting the go-ahead.

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Survivor's syndrome

Susan has learned that seniority, a good work ethic and kind colleagues are no match for the layoff axe sharpened by the current financial crisis. In July, after nearly 14 years with a Toronto card stock and paper company, the financial controller and two others were told that by mid-October their jobs would be history.

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The new networking

When the bell rings, dozens of strangers pair off and size each other up. They shake hands and start talking about life goals, past experiences and future dreams. . . This is speed mentoring, the new way to jump-start your destiny.

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Try job hunting the Chenoweth way

“I'm unemployed.” Few job seekers choose to shout it from the rooftops. But actress Kristin Chenoweth boldly announced her status Sunday as she accepted an Emmy for her role in the cancelled ABC series Pushing Daisies.

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CEOs go from making money to raising it

Peter Robinson is learning to deal with a new bottom line. As the chief executive officer of Mountain Equipment Co-op, he found success relatively easy to measure. But since leaving the company almost two years ago to become CEO of the David Suzuki Foundation, he's encountered a whole new set of challenges, since progress can't be measured by profits.

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From hiring hotbeds to passive recruiters

Terry Thompson was all set to head out the door to represent his employer at a Toronto job fair last October when his boss walked into his office and handed him a pink slip. The firm was downsizing, and Mr. Thompson's position as a job developer was among the first to go.

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Buddying up to the boss on Facebook

The on-line social networking site's popularity explosion is raising tricky issues in the workplace: how to respond to requests to connect with superiors and peers in a forum created mainly to share personal life outside of work.

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Looking for a raise? Be sure to do your homework

With the economy slumping and layoffs looming, asking for a raise might seem a more daunting and futile mission than it once was. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't try – as long as you make a case that you actually deserve it. You may be in a better position for a raise than you think, says Alan Kearns, career expert and founder of CareerJoy, a career coaching company.

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Thirty-five per cent of Canadians send e-mails they might rue

More than one-third of Canadians (35 per cent) admit they’ve sent an e-mail on the company server that could come back to haunt them, even while the same number of people acknowledge that their employer probably checks their account.

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Making the jump from manufacturing to retail

At a time of gut-wrenching job losses in the manufacturing industry, retailers are hiring like gangbusters. But can those who made solid careers working at auto plants and constructing products on factory floors make a transition to satisfying new careers focused on serving the consumer face-to-face?

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Out or in?

At the LGBTQ (Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgendered-Queer) youth group he volunteers with, Blair Croft has noticed an interesting phenomenon: while teens are becoming increasingly confident about their identities, they're still careful who they come out to -- particularly at work.

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Survivor's syndrome

Susan has learned that seniority, a good work ethic and kind colleagues are no match for the layoff axe sharpened by the current financial crisis. In July, after nearly 14 years with a Toronto card stock and paper company, the financial controller and two others were told that by mid-October their jobs would be history. But as she prepared to plow through her lengthy notice period, it wasn't Susan who expressed anguish at her loss, but a co-worker whose job was spared.

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Cold calls can lead to hot jobs

When Jeff Morrow returned to Toronto last spring after graduating from Montreal's McGill University with a bachelor's degree in music, he figured the best way to find a job in music production would be to use his connections among family and friends. But after a few pleasant chats yielded no job leads, the 23-year-old got frustrated and decided to try a different approach.

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Conferences great opportunities for career building

At busy conferences, it's easy to feel bogged down by the sheer volume of presentations and people. But if you're strategic, conferences can be great opportunities to expand your career horizons, says Alan Kearns, founder of Toronto career-coaching firm Career Joy.

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The new networking

When the bell rings, dozens of strangers pair off and size each other up. They shake hands and start talking about life goals, past experiences and future dreams. Some feel a spark, while others suffer through awkward silences. A few minutes later, the bell clangs again and they move on to the next potentially life-changing stranger. Speed dating? That's so 2003. This is speed mentoring, the new way to jump-start your destiny.

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Book your desk now - spaces are limited

Arriving at the office on his first day as a consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Tom Broen felt he'd been misled. It wasn't the work or the upper five-figure salary that upset him. But after five years of experience, he thought he was senior enough to qualify for his own desk.

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To give, or not, at the office

Working as an editor at a large media company, Moira Farr learned the ins and outs of office holiday gift swaps the hard way. Participating in a Secret Santa exchange, Ms. Farr decided to let her creative juices flow. So she produced a Martha Stewart recipe-inspired cranberry liqueur, decanted it into a tinted bottle, then proudly bestowed the concoction on a shy junior editor.

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Nimble Careers

The fast company has begotten the fast employee. "Staying in one place is a career hindrance. Within a few years, you appear to be a liability," says Alan Kearns, head coach of Canadian career coaching company CareerJoy.

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No time to retire

As the former chairman of Shanghai Nortel and vice-president of Nortel Semiconductors, Colbourne had more than enough stock options for a comfortable retirement. After 33 years with Nortel, he didn't need to work.

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Boss your career

"Income without leaving your home!" promises one online advertisement. "Achieve and enjoy a lifestyle of wealth and freedom," guarantees another, promising to teach you how to earn millions while lolling about in your pyjamas all day long.

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Great managers are like great coaches

Peter Jensen is a performance psychologist who has worked with Canada’s Olympic athletes for years. While other coaches focus on technical skills, Jensen helps athletes prepare mentally. He helped the Canadian women’s hockey team that won gold medals at the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City in 2002 and Torino, Italy, in 2006.

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Why dream jobs don't come true

A rockstar, a princess, a fireman -- what did you want to be when you "grew up"? And are you now shredding your guitar to arenas worldwide, donning a jeweled tiara or fighting fire with the best of them? Chances are you're not.

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Learning to adjust to a younger boss

In Good Company, starring Dennis Quaid and Topher Grace, tells the story of an ad executive who gets demoted in a corporate takeover, then learns that his new boss, Carter, is half his age, a business school prodigy with fresh ideas.

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Bucking for a Raise

Is now the time to hit your boss up for that raise? Toronto-based Hay Group reported this week that competition for workers is forcing employers to become "more aggressive" on pay.

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Your kid's drifting? Help is a phone call away

It's the latest thing: private career coaching for kids.And Laura Faulkner believes it's well worth the $695 investment.Ms. Faulkner has spent the past 25 years in the freight boarding business, importing and exporting cargo. Her husband, siblings and in-laws all work in the same field.

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When star vanishes, leader must fill void

As Michael Vick situation shows, a key player's loss can be devastating to the team but there are ways to speed recovery.

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Is a career coach right for you?

Alan Kearns, author of Get the Right Job Right Now, talks about what moms or dads returning to the work force need to know.

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Office jerks finish first

Picture an office where you're surrounded by decent human beings. Your co-workers share responsibility in good times and bad. They listen, they co-operate, they keep the office kitchen clean. Sound much like your office? Not likely.

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Harvard, Shmarvard

Leading Canadian universities have long played the prestige card when marketing themselves to potential students. But a new survey suggests holding a degree from a top-tier university influences one's future success far less than wide-eyed applicants are led to believe.

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When the axe falls: Adjusting to life after job loss

Eleanor Clitheroe recalls feeling numb, disoriented and barely able to comprehend "what was coming down" five years ago, when she was fired from her post as chief executive officer of Hydro One in a controversy over expenses.

Top 10 tips for salary negotiations

In our competitive economy, savvy negotiating skills are often prized. This will be your first opportunity to show you can take and hold a well-informed position in a professional environment.

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Boss your career

Copious amounts of advice, respectable and otherwise, are available for people who want to run their own companies. For many, the idea of turning their backs on the traditional workplace and working for themselves is incredibly tantalizing. After all, it's no surprise that after a long week of late nights spent frantically meeting deadlines and placating higher-ups, someone might be desperate to say goodbye to the grind.

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Finding a job that fits: A guide to career counseling options

It might feel like a knot in the pit of your stomach or a clenching around your heart. Perhaps you sense your blood pressure rise as you get closer to your office. Maybe the days drag so slowly that when you look at the clock expecting to see the workday's end, it's only 2:00 p.m.

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From hunting heads to coaching careers

One of Ottawa's best-known headhunters is now a career coach, illustrating how recruiters have adjusted to the high-tech bust.

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Feelings about tech job security differ by gender

Young women don't share men's confidence: study.

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TalentLab Builds a Brand

Focusing on relationships helped this Ottawa recruiting firm grow 400 percent in its first two years.

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Agents? Call Them Career Customizers

An employee with coveted skills may have no trouble finding a better deal, a better fit or just a fresh challenge. But few have much time to scope out their next moves.

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Not your Father's Headhunter

As the world changes, tech recruiters are changing right along with it. The biggest surprise? In the online era, a talent scout is more important than ever.

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Headhunters recast as high-tech talent agents

By treating its clients like their sports superstar counterparts, TalentLab hopes to better represent them. Sports superstars retain agents to negotiate contracts and represent their interests. So why not the same treatment for the new breed of tech superstars?

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A social passion

TalentLab, an Ottawa high tech recruiting firm, combines a zeal for business with a determination to make the world a better place. Hilary McLaughlin reports on how it follows both dreams.

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Strategic Approach to Recruiting

"I want to move to a strategic approach in technology recruitment rather than a reactive approach."

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